New Years Resolutions

A New year brings about a desire among many to change something about themselves, such as their physical appearance, attitudes or hobbies. The most common New Years resolutions are to lose weight, cut down on drinking and do more exercise. There is nothing wrong with these as resolutions, Christmas and New Years are not exactly the healthiest time of the year, but here is some inspiration from friends of The Yorker of alternative resolutions that you could embrace or adapt for yourselves. It is still only very early into 2016, you can still make a resolution if you so desire!

Hannah Stock, ‘Do what I want’

I’m not usually a ‘New Year, new me’ person, but this year is different! Instead of promising myself I’ll go to the gym, lose three stone, or learn to play the piano, this year I’ve made a, hopefully, more achievable resolution. I spend far too much of my time worrying about what other people might think of me, and base too many decisions based on what I think will make those around me happy, rather than simply doing what I want. So that’s this year’s resolution, to ‘do what I want’. As they say, you only live once, and I’m going to try to spend less time worrying needlessly about the opinions of others, and start making decisions that I am happy and proud of!

Allie Nawrat, ‘Challenge myself’

I am a relatively sensible, cautious person. I am also fundamentally lazy, and will always take the easy route where possible. However, in 2015 and again in 2016 I vowed to change this. I decided to challenge myself to do things that are out of my comfort zone. I chose a dissertation topic that I knew a limited amount about prior to my summer of research. I chose to serve on the Executive of two university Societies and push my time management skills to the limit. Finally, the biggest challenge yet will be an internship in Colombia for six weeks over the summer, which I am incredibly nervous but also excited about! If you always take the safe option then are you really fulfilling all your ambitions and capabilities. We are young, we can afford to make some mistakes if that is what it takes to really challenge yourself and learn important lessons about yourself.

Further ideas could be: travel more, give up buying unessential items (such as clothes) for the year, achieve a better work life balance or give time or money to charity on a regular basis

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Allie Nawrat

History and Politics Third year. Commentator for Backbench. Champagne Socialist.