5 tips for self-isolation

Picture credits here

With the coronavirus pandemic hitting most places across the world, it’s more important than ever that we find ways to fill our days of isolation and lockdown. This is a list of 5 ways to make the lockdown go a little faster!

Get into a routine

It’s so important during these uncertain times that you add some certainty to your days. Even if you don’t have any work to do, set yourself a regular time to wake up, speak to loved ones, and make meals. This will help your day to go a by a little faster.

Watch all your favourite films

It can be so hard to fill your evenings when there’s no pub, party or friend’s house to go out to. So, watching one of your favourite films is a good way to spend an evening, and even better if you can sync it up with someone else so that those evenings don’t feel quite so long.

Learn a new skill

While there’s no school, university or work, it’s easy to fall into unproductive patterns, but picking up a new skill can help keep you busy. And after the lockdown ends, you’ll have a brand new skill to use in the workplace or to show off about!

Do regular exercise

While it might not be possible to exercise outside right now, put in place some regular exercise time. Exercise is great for releasing endorphins and it can be a great boost for your self-esteem! There’s plenty of exercise and gym apps available, and if not, websites such as the NHS provide workouts for different levels.

Talk to people as much as possible

It’s awful not being able to see friends, family and loved ones whenever we want, but that doesn’t matter we can’t talk to people as much as possible. Whether that means a phone call to a friend every couple of days, or a video call with your boyfriend, it’s definitely good for your mood and happiness if you speak to people regularly.

I hope these tips help to keep you happy, healthy, and in good spirits in this difficult time!

The following two tabs change content below.

Eleanor Jones

Deputy Editor of the Yorker and final year History and French student at the University of York

Latest posts by Eleanor Jones (see all)