Man using desk while standing up

Can you burn calories with a standing desk?

Picture credits LifeSpan

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This article discusses the benefits of standing desks, debunking the myths around these stylish solutions.

Height-adjustable standing desks have garnered a lot of attention in the last few years, and some of the claims manufacturers make about them are just marketing myths, created to sell their products. However, on the other hand, there are some true, science-backed benefits behind using standing desks.

To help get rid of some of the myths, let’s now separate the fact from the fiction, so consumers can reach a reliable conclusion regarding how the standing desk can actually benefit them, and in what ways it isn’t all that great.

Can you really burn more calories with a standing desk?

It’s hard to answer this without first some explanation behind it. The short answer is yes, people do burn more calories when they are standing, as compared to when they are sitting. This applies to daily life, and not just when they are working behind a computer.

Additionally, every time we are standing there’s a high chance that we will be moving around a bit as well, which is very important for maintaining healthy blood circulation. Such movements are not as frequent while sitting on a chair. Not to mention, the little bit of additional movement also burns some additional calories.

As a result, when we use height-adjustable standing desks at work, we do burn more calories than we would if we were sitting behind a regular desk instead. This does not necessarily mean using a standing desk will cause you to lose weight as a result. The extra calories you burn by standing instead of sitting can be considered healthy in the long run, but the extra 8 calories burned per hour (on average) is not really enough to make anybody lose significant weight either.

In other words, a standing desk can indeed help us burn more calories while working, but it cannot help us with losing weight- at least not on its own.

Can standing desks help us prevent weight gain?

All high-quality, height-adjustable standing desks can help us prevent gaining more weight, and it has very little to do with the calories we burn while standing. According to experts, there are multiple impacts on our health if we sit for too long on most days of the week.

Out of the many which we are going to discuss soon, weight gain is one of the most severe and common symptoms. It has been found that switching between standing and seating positions at work prevents most of the
negative health effects that originate from sitting for hours on end, and preventing weight gain is just one of those positive effects seen from using height-adjustable standing desks.

Sitting constantly results in losing blood flow, which in turn makes us lethargic as an obvious effect. Using a standing desk improves blood circulation and prevents of lower back/neck/shoulder injuries. And by helping us avoid leading a sedentary lifestyle, a standing desk can indeed stop excess weight gain to a certain degree.

Are height-adjustable standing desks healthy in any other way?

If a company is telling you that height-adjustable standing desks can help you become slimmer in mere weeks all on their own, they are without a shadow of doubt lying.

However, if another manufacturer is highlighting a standing desk as being a healthy lifestyle choice, you have just found yourself an honest business. Although the extra calories burned per hour do help in the long run, it wasn’t originally designed to help with active or passive weight loss.

What height-adjustable standing desks are scientifically proven to be
helpful in, however, is the following:

  • Due to the fact that a standing desk allows us to work on our feet for as long as we can or want to, it improves blood circulation to a great extent
  • When we sit, our scopes of movement are limited, which leads to cramping, especially near the lower back region
  • As a standing desk allows unlimited position changes, our chances of getting a cramp is minimal, if present at all
  • Standing at work can reduce our chances of gaining weight and becoming lethargic
  • There is a possible link between sitting too much and diabetes, so standing more could, in some cases, help us prevent diabetes
  • Another study shows that people have a 147% higher chance of developing heart disease if they sit for too long at a stretch
  • The possibility of thwarting heart disease by standing and walking in between sitting sessions was established by a study on bus conductors in London

It is with complete understanding of these health benefits that FRISKA has engineered the designs behind each and every one of their own height- adjustable standing desks. The Swedish manufacturing method ensures quality, while their customer-centric approach towards their products is represented by not just a regular warranty, but a 10-year guarantee on both manual and electric height-adjustable standing desks.

The motorised or electric desks come highly recommended for the ease of
operation they bring, but even FRISKA’s manually adjustable standing desks come with multiple position settings and a smooth crank to keep every shift from sitting to standing heights effortless.

Not all claims about these new desks are entirely true. However, a height-adjustable standing desk is still very much related to developing a healthy lifestyle.

Under the current circumstances, height-adjustable standing desks can even be considered crucial in making this contemporary work from home structure physically sustainable for our bodies.

If you have never used an electric height adjustable standing desk before, rest assured that you will feel the difference soon enough. Just make sure that you are indeed adjusting the height to stand at times, instead of sitting behind it all day like you would behind any regular desk!

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