Image Credits: Digital Spy

Review: Jess Glynne Live (28/07/2017)

Image Credits: Digital Spy
Image Credits: Digital Spy

Do you live under a rock? If yes, have a nice day. If not, then you’ll be no stranger to the rich, warm and chocolatey tones that emanate from somewhere within the sweet breast of the delightfully down-to-earth Jess Glynne.

In her recent evening concert on the 28th July this year, the artist, who made her name as a feature on hit Clean Bandit record ‘Rather Be’ in 2014, burst into various famous venues worldwide, at the request of her own personal and growing fan base. Among these was York Racecourse.

In a performance that bordered on theatrical, complete with rhythm-sensitive mood lighting, an effective use of smoke and computerised backing screens, Glynne entranced concert-goers with the perfect blend of sleek showmanship and a deliciously vibrant set. Emerging head-to-toe in silver sequins from somewhere within the hazy folds of a smoke cloud, Glynne launches straight into a rendition of her first hit solo single, ‘Right Here’ (2014). A ripple of cheer breaks out and the atmosphere ignites and as the beat throbs throughout the venue.

Maintaining the feel-good tone of the performance, Glynne continues with her Clean Bandit collaboration single, choosing to accentuate the already-jazzy undertones with a solo by a live saxophonist, lending a deeper and more soulful feel to the pop song, truly making it her own.
Momentarily suspending the music to address her audience, Glynne breaks, welcoming her fans and making her apologies for the weather. I can’t help but feel, however, that the rain, adding so positively to the atmosphere as it does, is just another part of her carefully-staged performance…?

What follows is a mixed sequence of Glynne’s own songs, mashups and covers including ‘No Rights No Wrongs’, ‘Ain’t Got Far To Go’ and ‘Love Me’ from her 2015 album I Laugh when I Cry seamlessly melting into a catchy cover of ‘Déjà vu’ (Beyoncé ft. Jay Z, 2006).
Whilst, as a front-woman, Glynne already comes across incredibly warm and personable, a huge part of her likeability stems from the emotive vulnerability in her voice which heightens the relatability of her songs. Slowing the pace with an acoustic ballad, ‘Real Love’ (2014), the full capacity of her incredibly velvety vocals are given undiluted focus, allowing the sentiment of her verse to really sink in.

The set-list is complemented by some light choreography that is, at once, polished yet undone, understated yet effective and really brought the whole performance together.

There certainly was no place I’d rather had been!

 

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Charlie McCullough

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